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Shortages

Search for information about a medicine shortage and find out if there is a way to access an alternative product. 

A medicine shortage occurs when there is unlikely to be enough of a medicine in Australia for the people who need to take it. Suppliers must report shortages of prescription medicines and a small number of over-the-counter medicines to the TGA.

Each shortage listed on our medicine shortages reports page refers to a single product. There are usually alternative brands, strengths or dose forms of the same medicine available. 

You can view our medicine shortage alerts and search the medicine shortage reports database on our website. The information in the database will provide an estimate of how long the shortage will last and may tell you if there is an alternative medicine available. Our page on accessing medicines during a shortage explains more about accessing alternative products. 

Find out how we manage a medicine shortage, including information for sponsors on reporting a shortage and supplying alternative products during a shortage.

Latest alerts

  • Update: Limited semaglutide (Ozempic) supply

    There remains an increased global demand for semaglutide products which is impacting availability and certainty of supply of Ozempic (semaglutide) in Australia until early 2023.
  • Shortage of tenecteplase (Metalyse)

    Boehringer Ingelheim (BI) has advised the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) of a shortage of tenecteplase (Metalyse) injection that is predicted to extend over the next 18 months.

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