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Presentation: Updating medicine ingredient names: International harmonisation

TGA presentation: ARCS Scientific Congress Sydney, 11-12 May 2016

30 May 2016

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Presentation

  • Presented by: Jolanta Samoc, Project Manager, Scientific Evaluation Branch
  • Presented at: ARCS Scientific Congress Sydney
  • Presentation date: 11-12 May 2016
  • Presentation summary: From April 2016, TGA will be updating some medicine ingredient names used in Australia to align with names used internationally.

Transcript

Updating medicine ingredient names: International harmonisation

Jolanta Samoc
Project Manager,
Scientific Evaluation Branch

ARCS Express Learning, 12 May 2016

Slide 1 - Overview

Be informed: Some medicine ingredient names are changing

  • Ingredient terminology
  • What are the changes?
  • Informing health professionals and consumers

Slide 2 - Ingredient terminology

Australian Approved Names vs ingredient names used internationally

The World Health Organization's International Nonproprietary Names (INN) are the gold standard for medicine ingredient names Updating medicine ingredient names

Slide 3 - What are the changes

Some changes are minor

  • Spelling: amoxycillin → amoxicillin
  • Spacing: cyanocobalamin(57Co) → cyanocobalamin (57Co)
  • Hydration state: carbidopa anhydrous → carbidopa

Slide 4 - What are the changes?

Some changes are more significant → Dual labelling

  • lignocaine → lidocaine (lignocaine)
  • amethocaine → tetracaine (amethocaine)
  • colaspase → asparaginase (colaspase)

Slide 5 - Informing health professionals and consumers

Further information

Seen an ingredient you don't recognise?

TGA website - Updating medicine ingredient names

Slide 6 - Discussion and questions

Keep an eye on safety as medicine ingredient names change

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